The Hidden Survival Muscle In Your Body Missed By Modern Physicians That Keep Millions Of Men And Women Healthy

Intro

For thousands of years, one muscle has been at the center of all human health, vitality and fitness: the psoas major muscle (also known as the iliopsoas). Without this hidden survival muscle, you can’t thrive in modern society. Millions of people have no idea they have weak psoas muscles and their health, productivity and quality of life suffer as a result. This article will help you find out if your psoas muscles are healthy, and what you can do to strengthen them and make your body even more efficient at thriving.

Why don’t modern physicians tell you about your pelvic floor muscles?

Most doctors don’t know anything about pelvic floor muscles. Their medical training was mostly focused on treating sickness and injury, and they often lack even basic anatomy knowledge. The pelvic floor is an important part of your body—and if you’re not addressing it, you could be missing out on incredible benefits for your health and sex life. If you want to learn more about how to take care of your pelvic floor, read on!

How does exercising your pelvic floor muscles help you live longer, healthier lives?

The pelvic floor muscles, also called Kegel muscles, are located deep inside your body. Located between your pubic bone and tailbone, these muscles allow you to control when you urinate or have bowel movements. These muscles are connected to more than one third of your body’s bones: 17 in your pelvis, 2 in each thigh, 3 in each leg and 1 in each hip. Because these muscles link so many bones throughout your body together they also serve as a muscle bridge that help support your organs like intestines, bladder and uterus (if you are a woman) while supporting normal bodily functions like ejaculation and orgasm if you are a man.

What are the best exercises for strengthening my pelvic floor muscles?

You’ve probably never thought about strengthening your pelvic floor muscles, but if you’re suffering from incontinence or erectile dysfunction, it’s likely these exercises will be recommended to you. The pelvic floor muscles are a group of muscles that line your pelvis and support your bladder, uterus, and other internal organs. Keeping them strong can help reduce stress urinary incontinence (leakage) and may also improve sexual health. You’ve probably never thought about strengthening your pelvic floor muscles, but if you’re suffering from incontinence or erectile dysfunction, it’s likely these exercises will be recommended to you. The pelvic floor muscles are a group of muscles that line your pelvis and support your bladder, uterus, and other internal organs.

Where can I learn more about the pelvic floor muscles?

The best place to learn more about these muscles is at your local gym. Most of us know that to strengthen a muscle we need to perform exercises, but strengthening doesn’t just happen from performing these exercises. Strengthening happens when we make a conscious effort to activate (or flex) these muscles. If you’re interested in exercising your pelvic floor muscles you can learn how by asking for help from your trainer or physical therapist. The other great thing about working with a professional is that they can take measurements, such as strength and endurance, which will aid in evaluating progress!

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How do I use this blog as a resource tool to improve my health in other ways?

Besides working out, you can use your survival muscle to stretch and increase blood flow to your entire body. Just before bed, go into a pushup position with your arms straight out in front of you and hold for 15 seconds. Then bend your elbows, bringing them as close to 90 degrees as possible without moving from that push up position. Stay there for 15 seconds, then bring your arms back up again; repeat twice more. This exercise is not only great for stretching and opening up your chest muscles but will also allow blood to circulate more freely through your upper body area. It can feel awkward at first and might even be hard to hold at first because of muscle fatigue—but it will get easier over time as long as you practice regularly! You Want to Lean More Click Hear

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